Quiz: Test Your Activity IQ

  • We all want our kids to be healthy—especially in this electronics-heavy generation. But how much physical activity do they really need? What’s the best way to fit it in to our busy schedules? Which activities are best? And how can we drop the word “exercise” from our vocabulary when talking to our kids about play?

    Test your activity IQ to see how much you already know, and score some helpful hints along the way!

  • Question 1 of 5

    How much physical activity do school-age kids need each day?

    Yes, that's correct.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children 6 years and older get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day. That means heavier breathing, increased heart rate and maybe breaking a sweat, but that doesn’t mean your child needs to play organized sports. Active kids can get their daily dose of play by riding bikes, playing on the playground, taking a brisk walk and even dancing to their favorite song!

    No, that's not correct.

    The correct answer is: 60 Minutes

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children 6 years and older get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day. That means heavier breathing, increased heart rate and maybe breaking a sweat, but that doesn’t mean your child needs to play organized sports. Active kids can get their daily dose of play by riding bikes, playing on the playground, taking a brisk walk and even dancing to their favorite song!

  • Question 2 of 5

    You need to be active for 60 minutes straight to be healthy.

    Yes, that's correct.

    Most people don’t have an hour straight to dedicate to being active, and that’s OK! Break it up into two or three shorter activities.

    For example, your child could:

    • Walk to school, or play four square while waiting for the bus
    • Play basketball or soccer with friends after school
    • Take a family walk after dinner

    No, that's not correct.

    The correct answer is: False

    Most people don’t have an hour straight to dedicate to being active, and that’s OK! Break it up into two or three shorter activities.

    For example, your child could:

    • Walk to school, or play four square while waiting for the bus
    • Play basketball or soccer with friends after school
    • Take a family walk after dinner
  • Question 3 of 5

    How can physical activity help your child?

    Yes, that's correct.

    It is important to remember that many children feel stress from academics and homework, and might not feel like they have time to be active. Encourage them to take a brain break to boost their mood and help them focus.

    Quick brain break ideas:

    • Take the dog for a walk around the block
    • Turn on the radio and dance to two or three songs
    • Head outside to play catch or kick around a ball for 10 minutes

    No, that's not correct.

    The correct answer is: All of the above

    It is important to remember that many children feel stress from academics and homework, and might not feel like they have time to be active. Encourage them to take a brain break to boost their mood and help them focus.

    Quick brain break ideas:

    • Take the dog for a walk around the block
    • Turn on the radio and dance to two or three songs
    • Head outside to play catch or kick around a ball for 10 minutes
  • Question 4 of 5

    It is important to talk to your child about exercise.

    Yes, that's correct.

    False! Why? Kids don’t want to exercise or “work out.” Call it “play” instead, and make it fun—being an active kid should be fun! Set up a cool obstacle course, play a game of tag, or ask your child to teach you his favorite outdoor game!

    No, that's not correct.

    The correct answer is: False

    False! Why? Kids don’t want to exercise or “work out.” Call it “play” instead, and make it fun—being an active kid should be fun! Set up a cool obstacle course, play a game of tag, or ask your child to teach you his favorite outdoor game!
  • Question 5 of 5

    It’s your job to make your child be active.

    Yes, that's correct.

    True! But, don’t force it. Forcing it will turn physical activity into a power struggle and make it a negative in your child’s eyes.

    It’s your job to provide opportunities for activity, set screen time limits and be a role model. Active kids have different abilities and different likes. Find out how your child likes to move, and find ways to support it!

    No, that's not correct.

    The correct answer is: True

    True! But, don’t force it. Forcing it will turn physical activity into a power struggle and make it a negative in your child’s eyes.

    It’s your job to provide opportunities for activity, set screen time limits and be a role model. Active kids have different abilities and different likes. Find out how your child likes to move, and find ways to support it!

  • Congratulations!

    You have completed the quiz.

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    Now you know just how important it is for kids to enjoy plenty of play time. When you participate in active play with your kids, everybody wins! Be sure to provide fun opportunities for activity, set screen time limits and be a role model.